Hollywood Blvd … Then and Now

So it was a little over 80 years ago (like, 80 years, one month and a couple hours) that Howard Hughes’ wartime epic Hell’s Angels premiered to a thronging crowd at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre. (It also catapulted Jean Harlow to stardom, but that’s another post.) The glittering premier was the grandest such event Hollywood had […]

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Favorite Website of the Week: Sepia Town

Forget the Flux Capacitor—Time Travel is HERE. Well… virtually. SepiaTown is an ingenious new service that allows users to upload and map historical images from any given place or period.  (Think of it as a GoogleMap Street View with a Then and Now function!) We heart SepiaTown and want to live there. Permanently.  Starting now. […]

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Out of the Vaults: Lois Moran

Lois Moran was, briefly, an actress in silent films. But she is better known for the literary character she inspired: the vivacious red-headed starlet Rosemary Hoyt in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1934 novel Tender is the Night. Fitzgerald became enamored with Moran, whom he called the most ‘beautiful girl in Hollywood,’ and carried on an intense […]

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Albert Kahn’s Experimental Color Photography

Our earlier posting of early 20th century color photography in Russia generated quite a lot of interest, so we’re following up with a look at the work of French-Jewish photographer Albert Kahn.  The excellent photo blog Citynoise posted a collection of Kahn’s experimental color photography from the early 1900s, for which he used a process […]

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Albert Kahn's Experimental Color Photography

Our earlier posting of early 20th century color photography in Russia generated quite a lot of interest, so we’re following up with a look at the work of French-Jewish photographer Albert Kahn.  The excellent photo blog Citynoise posted a collection of Kahn’s experimental color photography from the early 1900s, for which he used a process […]

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Empire of Color: Early 20th Century Russian Photography

Sergei Prokudin-Gorskiiwas a Russian chemist who’s experimental color photography captures the life of Russia before the Revolution with striking realism. His process consisted of shooting black-and-white exposures with red, green and blue filters, combining them to create a color image. (This process was often done on board a makeshift dark room on his long train […]

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Raymond Cauchetier and the Nouvelle Vague

Next month, London’s James Hyman Gallery will showcase an exhibition of shots from the set of some of the French Nouvelle Vague’s celebrated darlings. Godard’s Breathless, Demy’s Lola and Truffaut’s Jules et Jim are all benchmark films of the New Wave period. Celebrated photographer Raymond Cauchetier caught cinematic history with his exclusive behind the scenes […]

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Chaplin Fashion

Katie, who runs the ever-fabulous OLD HOLLYWOOD GLAMOUR blog, posted  this recap of John Galliano’s recent fashion show for his 2011 spring collection, the inspiration of which happened to be none other than The Little Tramp. Yeah, I know, I flipped out too. It’s SUCH creepy-crazy-cool-concept that I really must tip my hat (or derby, […]

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The Truly Divine Olivia de Havilland

The magnificent Olivia de Havilland turns 94 years young today. Born in 1916 in Tokyo, Japan, where father held a legal practice, the de Havillands immigrated to California two years later for health reasons. The two year old Olivia and her one year old sister, Joan, would both grow up in the golden warmth of […]

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The Kitty Packard Pictorial of the Month: Montgomery Clift

On a brisk April evening in 1958, Broadway’s newly refurbished Paramount Theater hosted the glittering premiere of Edward Dmytryk’s World War II epic The Young Lions. The film, adapted from Irwin Shaw’s acclaimed novel, had been generating high interest given its lavish budget and A-list cast, namely, Marlon Brando, Dean Martin and Montgomery Clift. Perhaps […]

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