Charlie Chaplin and the Sound of Silence

  I thought it would be fun to explore Chaplin’s fascinating love/hate relationship with a little thing called … sound. Chaplin may have been the one filmmaker to hold out the longest against sound, but he also happened to be one of the earliest filmmakers to embrace it. A fitting contradiction given Chaplin was a […]

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Project Keaton Guest Post: Silent Volume

Silent film blogger Chris Edwards runs Silent Volume, a site dedicated to the art of silent filmmaking. Its tagline, “this medium is not dead,” is backed by a wealth of reviews, editorials and general musings on silent films great and small.  In conjunction with Project Keaton, Edwards has written a fabulous piece exploring the deeply […]

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Silent Films at the London Film Festival

A thoughtful and expressive piece appeared in today’s Guardian, praising the value, worth and beauty of silent cinema. Three silent’s are slated to be screened at the London Film Festival later this month: Underground (1928, directed by Anthony Asquith), J’accuse! (1919, directed by Abel Gance), and Laila (1929, directed by George Schneevoigt), which, Guardian writer […]

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Charlie Chaplin: Pictorial of the Month

“The little fellow,” Vanity Fair once wrote, “was not a small man.” Indeed, there are movie stars. There are superstars. There are legends. And then there’s Charlie Chaplin. He was born on April 16, 1889 in south London at a time when poverty was rife, housing was scarce,  and low-income tenements had decomposed into dirty, […]

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