Congratulations to “Harlean’s Heyday”

We’re a few days late, but the Pictorial finally has a winner in the giveaway sweepstakes for the Jean Harlow Blogathon.

If you’ll recall, to cap of Harlow’s Centenary Celebration, all participants in the blogathon were eligible to win a copy of the new book Harlow in Hollywood: The Blonde Bombshell in the Glamour Capital. The book had it’s launch party on Wednesday night at the grand opening of Harlow 100: the new Jean Harlow exhibit at the Max Factor Museum. Mark Vieira and Darrell Rooney, those consummate gentlemen, were  duly delighted by the terrific turnout (as was I) and it was great to mingle with the new fans (my colleagues from the Director’s Guild), right along with the old fans (the inimitable Lisa Burks).

Every last blogger for baby deserves a copy of this book, but the roulette wheel of chance has smiled upon blogstress Riika who runs the lovely Harlean’s Heyday blog.

Congratulations, Riikka and a final heartfelt THANK YOU to all who did so much over the past week.

The queue outside.

The swanky Hollywood 'do inside.

The Max Factor lobby -- an art deco dream

Paul Bern's commissioned mural of Jean with friends in a medieval setting. On display for THE first time.

The delightful Lisa Burks and myself, shoulder to shoulder with Jean :

a group of good friends and I went hogwild at the museum, a place we’d never paid visit to before, and outside of Jean’s exhibit, had a tremendous time bolting all over the building to oogle and ooh and ahh and the memorabilia.

My coworker and photo editor extraordinare channeling Colbert's fringe...

Another coworker and film guru, getting personal with Mr. Lancaster.

Me with my best gal: Jean

Congratulations to "Harlean's Heyday"

We’re a few days late, but the Pictorial finally has a winner in the giveaway sweepstakes for the Jean Harlow Blogathon.

If you’ll recall, to cap of Harlow’s Centenary Celebration, all participants in the blogathon were eligible to win a copy of the new book Harlow in Hollywood: The Blonde Bombshell in the Glamour Capital. The book had it’s launch party on Wednesday night at the grand opening of Harlow 100: the new Jean Harlow exhibit at the Max Factor Museum. Mark Vieira and Darrell Rooney, those consummate gentlemen, were  duly delighted by the terrific turnout (as was I) and it was great to mingle with the new fans (my colleagues from the Director’s Guild), right along with the old fans (the inimitable Lisa Burks).

Every last blogger for baby deserves a copy of this book, but the roulette wheel of chance has smiled upon blogstress Riika who runs the lovely Harlean’s Heyday blog.

Congratulations, Riikka and a final heartfelt THANK YOU to all who did so much over the past week.

The queue outside.

The swanky Hollywood 'do inside.

The Max Factor lobby -- an art deco dream

Paul Bern's commissioned mural of Jean with friends in a medieval setting. On display for THE first time.

The delightful Lisa Burks and myself, shoulder to shoulder with Jean :

a group of good friends and I went hogwild at the museum, a place we’d never paid visit to before, and outside of Jean’s exhibit, had a tremendous time bolting all over the building to oogle and ooh and ahh and the memorabilia.

My coworker and photo editor extraordinare channeling Colbert's fringe...

Another coworker and film guru, getting personal with Mr. Lancaster.

Me with my best gal: Jean

The Jean Harlow Blogathon: Day 6 & 7

Bye, bye pretty baby

I really can’t believe the last day of the Jean Harlow Blogathon is here. So much thought and planning and preparation and excitement and now… it’s nearly over. It’s been a heck of a great ride, and the contributions that poured in from all over the world have been, in a word, superlative.

The entire point of this Blogathon has been to help keep Harlow’s legend–and Harlow’s  Hollywood– alive. And even though 7 decades have passed since her final film, this Blogathon has proved that Harlow’s white hot flame is as bright and clear as ever–  something that could not be possible without bloggers like all of you who participated this week. The depth and complexity of her personal life freed from the shackles of sensationalism and her body of work the subject of serious appreciation and study. Finally, it truly feels like Harlean Carpenter’s life and legacy is being treated with the respect that so sadly eluded her in real life.

What a stirring tribute this week has been– I only hope it has been as much fun for all of you as it has been for us.

And to Harlean herself… we all love you!

Right, enough of the eulogizing, on to the fun stuff:

Harlean’s Heyday

What can I say about Riiki at Harlean’s Heyday? She is such a terrific blogger and her contributions to this Blogathon have been superb. Her last entry fot the Blogathon is her best. “Like an Uncensored Movie” is a fascinating history of the Production Code:

Red-Headed Woman features content that might come away as shocking even to contemporary audiences. It not only depicts vice but also glorifies it, a fact that is emphasised by its unapologetic ending. As Doherty puts it: “Virtually every diegetic ellipsis in the film is occupied by the certainty that Lil and the man she was with in the prior scene have spent the interim in an illicit sexual encounter.” Any imaginative gaps are filled by subsequent, sexually suggestive dialogue. “There we were like an uncensored movie,” Lil gloats in one scene.

***

The Platinum Page
If anyone has been a champion of this Blogathon, it’s been Lisa Burks. This truly lovely lady and all-around superstar has, for her final entry to the Blogathon, rounded up a collection of her personal favorite YouTube video tributes to Harlow.

Don’t wince at the term “youtube tributes”– Lisa’s selection of videos are extremely well done!

***

Vintage Powder Room
It is highly fitting that Vintage Powder Room, a blog dedicated to vintage cosmetics and accessories, conjure a  post all about beauty… Harlow style. Joan is with The Art Deco Society of Los Angeles and her proclivity for prose makes for a highly enjoyable read:

Jean Harlow was a cotton candy confection of a woman, but she never seemed aloof or unapproachable. She often wore a smile, if little else, and her eyes were full of intelligence, warmth, and humor.  She will be forever mourned.

Hear, hear!

(read more)

***

Clarosureaux

More photos from the prolific Kevin at Clarosureaux. He’ll be dedicating most of the month of March to Harlow, so just because the Blogathon is ending doesn’t mean Kevin’s work is done! MUCH more beautiful work to come from his inspired hand. Have fun checking out the latest!

***


Old Movie Nostalgia

Old Movie Nostalgia joins in for the final day of the fete with a Tribute to Harlow that brings attention to how dearly loved she was by her crew, co-workers and, really, anyone who happened to know her:

A man’s growth is seen in the successive choirs of his friends” ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

Although she was never motivated by stardom or fame, if Emerson’s quote was being applied to movie stars, it seems that Jean Harlow could be considered one Hollywood’s biggest stars. The kind words that have been spoken of her over the years by her many friends speak to what a wonderful person she was…

(read more)

***

Rob Stevens

Rob Stevens from Holland also jumps in with a last minute nod to the baby. Thanks, Rob!

***

Shadowplay

Shadowplay, wonderful Shadowplay, is back and giving its much-loved Intertitle of the Day to a Laurel & Hardy/Harlow silent Double Whoopee. “Might I presume that you would condescend to accept my escortage” Ollie asks of Jean. And if you’ve seen this classic short, you know what happens next…

***

Row Three

Oh, Row Three… how I do heart thee. Jandy, one of Row Three’s regular contributors, stepped up to bat for Harlow with “Jean Harlow- The Original Smart Blonde“… a title that is, absolutely, my favorite of the entire week.

If  Hollywood luminaries’ lives lasted a length commensurate with the brightness of their stars, Jean Harlow would have been blowing out her own candles for her 100th birthday yesterday. As it is, the opposite is often true, and Harlow died much before her time at the age of 26, leaving behind a timeless legacy in her brief nine years as a Hollywood actress, comedienne, and sex symbol. ..

***


The Hollywood Revue

Angela from The Hollywood Revue has been one of the biggest supporters of this Blogathon and we give her a hearty THANK YOU. For her final entry, she reviews Bombshell, a film generally regarded to be one of Harlow’s finest films. (I happen to agree with Angela’s preference to Libeled Lady. Glad to know I’m not the only one!)

***

The New Jersey Star-Ledger

Stephen Whitty of the New Jersey Star-Ledger has been so kind as to submit a solid profile of Harlow in honor of her centenary. We are absolutely delighted that the Star-Ledger is interested in the Blogathon and proudly add them to our Blogroll:
Once Hollywood invented itself, it began to invent archetypes. William S. Hart was the Good Bad Man. Rudolph Valentino was the Latin Lover. Gary Cooper was the Quiet American.

And Jean Harlow was, simply, the Blonde, the woman who wasn’t as dumb as she looked (or any better than she had to be), the kind who was willing to take a man as he was (or maybe just take him) — a laughing, brassy, no-regrets bombshell.

***

Comets Over Hollywood

Comets Over Hollywood gets a post in just under the wire and I’m quite pleased: it’s the only entry that tackles the infamous 1965 film Harlow. The post begins with the words “I have just finished the worst movie ever.” Heartily agreed, mate. Even if the film’s subject hadn’t been about Harlow, it would still stand out as probably the worst period film ever made. If you cringed at the Victorian costumes in the 194o version of Georgian-era Pride and Prejudice… Harlow will send you into convulsions. Bouffant hair? Check. Austin Powers rotating bed? Check. 60s muzak soundtrack? Check. Read The Battling Carols for a full critique.

Jean Harlow Sizzles as Star of the Month

star of the month

I’m sure you’ve all probably seen this, but I was so wowed by it just had to do a quick lil’ post. TCM’s advert for Jean Harlow as Star of the Month is seriously sizzling. No holds barred sexy as hell.

Well done, TCM. You will never cease to amaze:

http://www.tcm.com/mediaroom/video/378845/Jean-Harlow-Star-Of-the-Month-Movie-Promo-March-2011.html

Harlow at 100: Day 4 of the Jean Harlow Blogathon

Harlow at 100: Day Four of the Jean Harlow Blogathon!

The Platinum Bombshell. born March 3, 1911

Today is the day, folks!

The hundredth birthday of one cinema’s finest comediennes and a genuinely warm, kind-hearted lady. We are halfway through the Blogathon and you guys are really showing the love. Is today’s lineup ever a lulu! Birthday tributes to the baby are pouring in from all over the globe, it’s truly thrilling!

So many posts to get to, so without further ado:

***

MUBI

Very proud to announce that the cineaste gods at MUBI have graced The Blogathon with a lovely tribute to Harlow on the Daily Mubi site. (Thanks so much for sharing in the fun, guys!)

Mythical Monkey

Mythical Monkey joins us as well with a post for Harlow’s Hundredth and he hit’s the nail right on the head: “If she’d just been another pretty face, she would have been forgotten long ago.”


TCM

TCM’s Movie News is not an official Blogathon partner, but did plug this lovely mention of the new Harlow exhibit at the Hollywood Max Factor Museum.

Silent Stanzas

Jennifer’s Silent Stanzas chimes in today with “For Harlean” – a beautiful poem for Harlow on her 100th.

Thrilling Days of Yesteryear

Ivan at Thrilling Days of Yesteryear decided to take a look at Harlow’s work in silent’s with comedy legends Laurel and Hardy. (Ivan’s sister shares Harlow’s birthday so it’s a double treat for him.)

True Classics

Brandie at True Classics has favored the 1936 screball comedy Libeled Lady with She May Be His Wife But She’s Engaged to Me!” It’s The Pictorial’s absolute favorite Harlow film and Brandie definitely does it justice.

Tara Hanks

Tara Hanks’ “American Bombshells: Marilyn and Jean Harlow” makes a great assessment of the careers of both bombshells. As Clara Bow, the first ‘It Girl’, said after Monroe’s death, ‘A sex symbol is a heavy load to carry, especially when one is tired, hurt and bewildered.’

David Benard

From France we have David Benard with a very beautifully presented post for the Harlow’s centenary. (Joyeux Anniversaire, Baby!)

I’ll Take the Snap Out of Your Garters!

Another newcomer, I’ll Take the Snap Out of Your Garters, (how brilliant of a blog title is that?!?) enters the blogathon today with a fitting tribute.

Silence is Platinum

Jessica at Silence is Platinum offers a very personal account of what makes Harlow so special.

Clarosureaux

Kevin at Clarosureaux is back today, this time taking on the Harlow classic Bombshell (Hollywood historians take special note of his post– he needs your help!)

Carole & Co.

Vincent from Carole & Co. returns with a tribute to Harlow – even bestowing his Lombard avatar with Harlow’s image for the occasion! (Awww, thanks Vincent!)

Edward Copeland on Film

One of the more comprehensive entries to date is Josh’s “Centennial Tribute” to Jean over at Edward Copeland on Film.

11 East 14th Street

Of equal depth is Gene from 11 East 14th Street with “My Search for Jean Harlow”—a fascinating in depth look into the woman who became the legend.

Noir and Chick Flicks

And finally, into the fray comes Dawn at Noir and Chick Flicks who has prepared a terrific review one of the less discussed of Harlow’s films, Suzy.

***

(Apologies if I missed anyone on today’s update– you will absolutely make it for tomorrow’s edition!)

Harlow at 100: Day 4 of the Jean Harlow Blogathon

Harlow at 100: Day Four of the Jean Harlow Blogathon!

The Platinum Bombshell. born March 3, 1911

Today is the day, folks!

The hundredth birthday of one cinema’s finest comediennes and a genuinely warm, kind-hearted lady. We are halfway through the Blogathon and you guys are really showing the love. Is today’s lineup ever a lulu! Birthday tributes to the baby are pouring in from all over the globe, it’s truly thrilling!

So many posts to get to, so without further ado:

***

MUBI

Very proud to announce that the cineaste gods at MUBI have graced The Blogathon with a lovely tribute to Harlow on the Daily Mubi site. (Thanks so much for sharing in the fun, guys!)

Mythical Monkey

Mythical Monkey joins us as well with a post for Harlow’s Hundredth and he hit’s the nail right on the head: “If she’d just been another pretty face, she would have been forgotten long ago.”


TCM

TCM’s Movie News is not an official Blogathon partner, but did plug this lovely mention of the new Harlow exhibit at the Hollywood Max Factor Museum.

Silent Stanzas

Jennifer’s Silent Stanzas chimes in today with “For Harlean” – a beautiful poem for Harlow on her 100th.

Thrilling Days of Yesteryear

Ivan at Thrilling Days of Yesteryear decided to take a look at Harlow’s work in silent’s with comedy legends Laurel and Hardy. (Ivan’s sister shares Harlow’s birthday so it’s a double treat for him.)

True Classics

Brandie at True Classics has favored the 1936 screball comedy Libeled Lady with She May Be His Wife But She’s Engaged to Me!” It’s The Pictorial’s absolute favorite Harlow film and Brandie definitely does it justice.

Tara Hanks

Tara Hanks’ “American Bombshells: Marilyn and Jean Harlow” makes a great assessment of the careers of both bombshells. As Clara Bow, the first ‘It Girl’, said after Monroe’s death, ‘A sex symbol is a heavy load to carry, especially when one is tired, hurt and bewildered.’

David Benard

From France we have David Benard with a very beautifully presented post for the Harlow’s centenary. (Joyeux Anniversaire, Baby!)

I’ll Take the Snap Out of Your Garters!

Another newcomer, I’ll Take the Snap Out of Your Garters, (how brilliant of a blog title is that?!?) enters the blogathon today with a fitting tribute.

Silence is Platinum

Jessica at Silence is Platinum offers a very personal account of what makes Harlow so special.

Clarosureaux

Kevin at Clarosureaux is back today, this time taking on the Harlow classic Bombshell (Hollywood historians take special note of his post– he needs your help!)

Carole & Co.

Vincent from Carole & Co. returns with a tribute to Harlow – even bestowing his Lombard avatar with Harlow’s image for the occasion! (Awww, thanks Vincent!)

Edward Copeland on Film

One of the more comprehensive entries to date is Josh’s “Centennial Tribute” to Jean over at Edward Copeland on Film.

11 East 14th Street

Of equal depth is Gene from 11 East 14th Street with “My Search for Jean Harlow”—a fascinating in depth look into the woman who became the legend.

Noir and Chick Flicks

And finally, into the fray comes Dawn at Noir and Chick Flicks who has prepared a terrific review one of the less discussed of Harlow’s films, Suzy.

***

(Apologies if I missed anyone on today’s update– you will absolutely make it for tomorrow’s edition!)

Blog it for Baby: Day Three of the Jean Harlow Blogathon

Day Three of the Jean Harlow Blogathon!

"A square shooter if there ever was one." - Spencer Tracy. (Image colorized by Victor Mascaro.)

 

Day three of the Blogathon is here and Jean’s 100th is one day away!

Tomorrow the Pictorial will be celebrating in high style, along with countless fans around the world, to commemorate the life of this unforgettable legend. Things are kicking into high gear around here, and if I haven’t replied to any requests to participate: I WILL! So keep those posts coming!

***

Ann Dvorak: Hollywood’s Forgotten Rebel

Christina runs Ann Dvorak: Hollywood’s Forgotten Rebel which is a real labor of love, dedicated to a neglected Hollywood actress. She’s joined the Blogathon with “Harlow & Dvorak at 100: An Appreciation,” and compares the difference between two women’s careers:

At first glance it seems that Jean Harlow and Ann Dvorak were worlds apart. Harlow was the wise-cracking platinum blonde who was able to use overt sexuality as a comedic weapon. Dvorak was the brooding brunette whose high-wire intensity played out best in dramatic form. Harlow landed at M-G-M, a studio who carefully crafted an on screen persona that film fans loved and sent her skyrocketing to the top of the box-office. Dvorak was at Warner Bros., a studio focused more on making movies than movie stars and who let Ann languish in mostly supporting roles unworthy of her talent …

(read more)

***

Freewheelin’ Pilgrim

Mark at Freewheelin Pilgrim has penned a love letter to a screen goddess. “The Boy Who Loved the Bombshell” is a sweet, sentimental and honest account of just why this 21st Century young’un just can’t get enough of an early 20th Century actress:

Jean Harlow is my celebrity crush. Sounds a bit strange doesn’t it? I mean, I’m 20 years old and she’s been dead for nearly 74 years. But it’s true. Whenever my friends sit around discussing who is “the hottest actress”, I always say “Jean Harlow”. This, naturally, gets a chorus of “huh?”s and “who’s she?”s. I simply tell them to look her up

My love for “Baby Jean” (my nickname for her) began at the tender age of 16. I was in Big W (a department store like K-Mart) for their quarterly DVD sale. I had my eyes set on the “Warner Brothers Gangster” DVDs I’d seen in the catalogue and, thankfully, I managed to get all 6. So I went home and put The Public Enemy on…

(read more)

***

Evangeline Holland

Evangeline Holland joins the Blogathon today with “The Platinum Blonde Goes Red.” In it she tackles the topic of the highly risky decision by MGM to cast the most famous blonde in movies as a red-head….

Jean was under contract to Howard Hughes at the time and his publicity director, Lincoln Quarberg, ran with the new phrase by organizing 3,000 Platinum Blonde Clubs and offering $10,000 to anyone who could replicate the “secret” forumla used to keep Miss Harlow’s hair its celebrated shade. Quarberg planted stories in the popular movie magazines to feed the fictional origins of Jean’s hair, claiming her luminous white tresses were the result of an accident at the beauty parlor…

(read more)

***

Harlean’s Heyday

Quickly becoming a favorite around here, Harlean’s Heyday is back today with a second installment in a series discussing they style that made Harlow a fashion icon. “Harlow’s Casual Style” is a treat because it undresses the image to uncover the real girl beneath it all:

Jean’s casual looks are quite a departure from the dramatic, curve hugging bias-cut gowns that largely mark her formal and on-screen style. It is actually her everyday style that I personally find the most inspiring.

In her own home you’d most frequently find a make-up free Jean Harlow wearing a pair of shorts, a polo shirt and tennis shoes. She didn’t wear stockings, not even during the winter months. Jean was an athletic lady, who played golf and tennis, rode horses and enjoyed swimming. Her flair for sports is certainly evident in her casual style….

(read more)

***

Platinum Page

Lisa Burks, the grand dame of Harlow blogging is back today with a great plug for the new Jean Harlow exhibit at The Max Factor Museum in Hollywood, which finally opens tomorrow:

The new Jean Harlow Exhibit, guest curated by Darrell Rooney, opens this Thursday (Jean’s 100th Birthday) at The Hollywood Museum in the Historic Max Factor Building. Back in the day, long before it was even a make-up museum, Jean often visited this building to be treated by Mr. Factor himself when it was his salon.

***

Sinamatic Salve-Ation

http://sinaphile.wordpress.com/2011/03/02/the-dreaming-moon-jean-harlow-and-the-magnetic-fields-get-lost/

A highly literary entry comes from Ariel at Sinamatic Salve-Ation and the Blogathon is very proud to present it to you readers.  “Jean Harlow and the Magnetic Fields Get Lost” takes its inspiration from a modern rock album and effectively paints Harlow’s portrait in what is a most beautiful piece:

This is my first blog for the Jean Harlow blogathon, which is being done to celebrate what would have been her 100th birthday (March 3rd). In a way, I felt compelled to write for this because Harlean Harlow Carpenter née Jean Harlow was only 26 years old when she died. She deserves a little more recognition. We all know about Marilyn, but without the original Platinum Blonde, Ms. Monroe wouldn’t’ve had a high heel to stand on…

(read more)

***

Via Margutta 51

We’re so pleased to Via Margutta along for the Blogathon! Clara’s blog  is a thorough delight as is her entry for the Blogathon: “Red-Headed Woman Meets Twitter.”  You read that right, and you gotta see this—it’s just a real kick and the icing on the cake for a day of stellar Harlow blogging!

My favorite tweet so far in the Lil Andrews/Bill Legendre affair:

@Lil: OMG!

Read it here

***